Forum Replies Created

  • Author
    Posts
  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Since the late 13th century and throughout the 14th century, the fresco painting technique develops in a more complex and accurate execution and “mimesis”, similar but not coincident with the one pertaining to the ancient Roman painting, as it occurs in the mural painting cycle at the basilica di San Francesco ad Assisi and the frescoes by Pietro Cavallini at the basilica di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere in Rome.
    The organization of the paint layering evolves in respect to the so-called Pre-Romanic and Romanic periods: the layers of mortar include the “arriccio” and the “intonaco”, the use of the preparatory drawing “a sinopia” on the arriccio is adopted and the procedure involving the application of the intonaco per “giornate” allows more limited and controlled areas to be decorated at every turn, as already known by the Romans. Subsequently, the system of color overlayering is also abandoned in favor of the system of color juxtaposition, which gives the painting that peculiar and luminous compactness.
    Moreover, in the 14th century, a more conspicuous change involves the use of the “spolvero” gradually replacing the preparatory drawing “a sinopia”, yet only for ornamental elements.
    MR

  • in reply to: Where was the Temple of Juno exactly located in Rome? #4191
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    As also suggested by recent studies, the temple of Iuno Moneta was probably located in the area where, at a later stage, the basilica di Santa Maria in Aracoeli was then built, especially nearby its transept, yet the exact location of the temple on the Arx spur has been debated for a long time, due to the fragmentation of archaeological data and later transformations.
    For example, other scholars have supposed that the religious complex of Santa Maria in Aracoeli was built on the space belonging to the Auguraculum.
    However, both the temple of Iuno and the Auguraculum were probably located in the same area of the Aracoeli complex on the north-eastern corner of the Capitoline Hill.
    MR

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator
  • in reply to: Where can I enjoy theatrical performances in summertime? #4195
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    If you can understand Italian language, we recommend the Pirandelliana, the annual series of shows performing the plays by the brilliant Italian author Luigi Pirandello. You can enjoy them in the beautiful context of the panoramic gardens of the basilica dei Santi Bonifacio e Alessio, between the 9th July and the 9th August. If you prefer to time travel back to the Shakespearean age you can attend the theatrical events at the enchanting Silvano Toti Globe Theatre, immersed in the beautiful scenario of Villa Borghese, between the the 2nd July and the 27th September (the last plays of this season will be performed in English!).
    MR

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Besides The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon, you can rather start off with the still fundamental Geschichte der Stadt Rom im Mittelalter by Ferdinand Gregorovius, published between 1859 and 1872. You’ll easily find it translated into English (History of Rome in the Middle Ages), a full text here. In the volume I, book II, you’ll find some information dealing with the beginning of the reign of Flavius Odoacer and the period between the 5th and 6th centuries AD.
    Alternatively, you can check out the third volume of the “Storia di Roma” directed by A. Schiavone, entitled “L’età tardoantica. Crisi e trasformazioni” (Torino, 1993) and the bibliography cited there.
    MR

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    There are so many evocative names of places in Rome!
    The first one that comes to mind is “Giardino degli Aranci”, literally the “Garden of the Orange trees”, which is the common name for parco Savello, deriving from the abundant presence of these plants. It was the vegetable garden cultivated by the Dominican priests from the next basilica di Santa Sabina all’Aventino. The Crescenzi and then the Savelli families held the area comprising that garden in the Middle Ages, but starting from around the 1930s the garden became public and everybody can now enjoy the beautiful view of Rome from there.
    MR

  • in reply to: Where can I find Egyptian art collections in Rome? #4204
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Here’s the main institutions featuring Egyptian art in Rome:
    Accademia d’Egitto;
    Egyptian art collection at the Museo di Scultura Antica Giovanni Barracco;
    Sala Egizia at the Musei Capitolini;
    Museo del Vicino Oriente, Egitto e Mediterraneo;
    Egyptian collection at the Museo Nazionale Romano – Palazzo Altemps;
    Museo Gregoriano Egizio at the Musei Vaticani (Città del Vaticano).
    MR

  • in reply to: What to visit near the Vatican on the same day? #4206
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Visiting the Vatican Museums and Saint Peter’s basilica is really worth all of your time. On the same day, just enjoy the art historical treasures you’ll find on your way through the center of Rome. For example, at the end of via della Conciliazione on Lungotevere Vaticano, catch a glimpse of the chiesa della Santissima Annunziata in Borgo Santo Spirito: its façade now reconstructed was designed by Pietro Passalacqua and was a 18th century jewel reminiscent of the renowned Baroque architect Francesco Borromini.
    MR

  • in reply to: What events do you suggest for summer nights? #4208
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    We would like to recommend the special opening of the Colosseum on summer nights. Check out also the fascinating initiative at Castel Sant’Angelo.
    MR

  • in reply to: What should I see in Rome in September? #4210
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    We think you shouldn’t miss to visit the archaeological gem of Ostia Antica, at a neighborhood of Rome near the seaside that you can reach in about half an hour by train. Here the website.
    You can also have the opportunity to enjoy the night openings of the Vatican Museums on the 25th September (every Friday) and the musical accompaniment. Be sure to make reservation on the official website, where you can find the program and other info.
    For the beautiful scenery, we suggest the classical music concerts at the Theatre of Marcellus (14th September: Schubert and Chopin played by the pianist Rossana Lanzillotta; 15th September: Paganini and Bach played by the saxophonist Isabella Stabio; 25th September: Haydn and Bartòk played by the two violinists Giulio Menichelli and Samuele Michele Cascino). Visit thewebsite of the organizing association for further info. For music concerts we also recommend to check the program at the Auditorium Parco della Musica.
    Finally, we could suggest the two special events series entitled “Journeys through Ancient Rome: 2 stories and 2 routes”, running every evening in two places: the show at the Forum of Augustus at 9.00 pm – 10.00 pm – 11.00 pm and the show relating to the Forum of Caesar taking place at Trajan’s Forum every 20 min between 9.00 and 12.00 pm. More info on the official site.
    Feel free to ask us more info if you have specific requests or need practical details.
    Hope this helps!
    MR

  • in reply to: Which libraries do you recommend to see? #4212
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Besides the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, we recommend these ancient libraries you can admire even only mixed up among the silent readers:
    Biblioteca Angelica in the former Convento degli Agostiniani near piazza Navona. This library is often the beautiful location for concerts, exhibitions and other events. It is possible to attend group visits on Wednesday and Friday (9.00 am – 2.00 pm). It is also possible to see the Salone Vanvitelliano during the opening hours of the library (without disturbing the readers);
    Biblioteca Vallicelliana and the stunning Salone Borromini, designed in the 17th century by Francesco Borromini and completed by Camillo Arcucci, inside the Oratorio dei Filippini;
    Biblioteca dell’Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei e Corsiniana in Palazzo Corsini alla Lungara, which boasts a rich collection of texts started back in the 17th century. Here’s a short story of the library in English;
    Sala della Crociera, currently pertaining to the Biblioteca di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte. These spaces once belonged to the Studio del Collegio Romano found by Sant’Ignazio di Loyola and they still conserve the 17th c. shelvings;
    Biblioteca Casanatense: the free access to the ancient Salone Monumentale is possible Monday-Friday (11.30 am – 1.00 pm), in alternative you can book a guided tour.
    MR

  • in reply to: Where can I find Christmas markets in Rome? #4214
    Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    Rome is full of markets and especially during the Christmas holidays some piazzas become populated by luminous carousels and colorful stands. Nevertheless, be aware that not everywhere you’ll find characteristic markets able to embellish the beautiful settings of Rome, nor supplied in particular with good quality products. So we’ll try to spot the ones deserving your attention. [UPDATED on 14 December 2015]
    • The most renowned one is the Christmas market in piazza Navona, programmed to be staged until the 6th of January, when a specific and traditional party for children usually takes place to celebrate the Epiphany. 26 November – 6 January, 10.00 am – 1.00 am (weekdays), 10.00 am – 2.00 am (weekends). The programmed Christmas market in piazza Navona has been unexpectedly canceled this year 2015 due to a complicated situation between Rome municipality and the stands owners.
    In alternative to the market in piazza Navona, other markets/exposition stands will be set up here and there:
    • Mercatino di Natale in piazza Mazzini. Open between 2-27 December, 10.00 am – 9.00 pm (closed on 25 December);
    • Natale a ponte Milvio (at ponte Milvio). Open between 8 December – 6 January, 9.30 am – 10.00 pm;
    • Natale all’Auditorium is the name of the event taking place at the Auditorium Parco della Musica (via Pietro de Coubertin 28), where an ice rink, artisan stands, performances and other initiatives are organized between 8 December – 10 January (ice rink timetable from 16 December: 10.00 am – 00.00 am everyday, 10.00 am – 4.00 pm on 24 December, 3.00 pm – 00.00 am on 25 December, 12.00 am – 00.00 am on 1 January);
    Arti & Mestieri, a market where to find artisanal products and Italian food, located at the Nuova Fiera di Roma (via Portunese 1645, it takes about 20 minute to get there by regional train from Rome center). Running a few days at 2.00 pm – 10.00 pm on 17 December, 10.00 am – 10.00 pm on 18-20 December (free entrance).
    MR

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    If you arrive by cruise ship, we presume you’ll land at Civitavecchia harbor, right? So you can take one of the frequent trains from the Civitavecchia central station until Roma Termini station. It takes between 1.03 and 1.20 h with a regional train (from 5€) and around 40 minutes with a direct train (from 15€). You can book the tickets on Trenitalia website and then check the realtime transits on Viaggiatreno website, just type “Civitavecchia” after clicking “Train station” and you can check arrivals, departures and delays of all the trains through that station. Here’s also the timetable of Roma – Civitavecchia line valid until the 12th of December. The only inconvenience could be the distance between the Civitavecchia harbor and the train station that is almost 1km, beyond possible delays and overcrowding in the peak hours. We think however this is the best solution, also due to the relatively cheap costs and safety from tourists scams. You could also ask the shuttle driver to be delivered to the train station. Further info here.
    There are also many private companies that offer transfers between Civitavecchia and Rome at higher prices but at present we don’t feel comfortable in suggesting any of them.

    In order to go to the airport, we would suggest you again to take the train and this should be a more comfortable connection. You can use the same Trenitalia website to book the tickets from Roma Termini station to Fiumicino aeroporto. There’s the specific and frequent train Leonardo Express which takes around 32 minutes to arrive at the airport at around 14€.
    MR

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    I need before and after photos of the restoration works performed on the masterpiece by Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

  • Milestone Rome
    Milestone Rome
    Moderator

    You can find them on the Soprintendenza SPSAE e Polo Museale della Città di Roma website.
    In particular, this is a direct link to download the photos. You can also find more specific info downloading the restoration notepaper equipped with other pics.
    Hope this helps!
    MR

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 48 total)